Turkish Style Spinach

14

Sunday 01 March, 2015 by Uncle Spike

Popeye had a point…. Spinach IS an excellent source of nutrition, but to be honest, I’d never really fancied it, usually served ‘boiled and boring’. However, this basic Turkish recipe makes for a really tasty winter warmer meal. So here’s another photo step-by-step story for you from the Spike Kitchen. 

.

Step one

Trim and cut one kilogram (2.2 pounds) of fresh spinach (good job whilst catching up on your regular TV series). The root needs to be trimmed off and discarded, and the stalks and leaves cut up. We tend to cut the best part of the leaves into strips (see red bowl), and freeze them down for use later on. For this dish, we are using the stalks and base of the leaves only (see green bowl).

DSCF2239_blog

.

Note the zero waste policy. Even the base of the stalk is kept, with just the root itself being removed.

.

DSCF2241_blog

.

Step two

If you have purchased your spinach from a shop, it may well be pre-washed and even trimmed. Often too, commercial spinach is produced in plastic tunnels, with minimal contact with the earth, so the cleaning we go through may not be all that necessary. However, ours is grown in the soil, with a very high level of goat poo, so washing and soaking three, four or even five times is a necessity to remove any soil – not so much for the sake of cleanliness, just so it doesn’t taste gritty.

DSCF2244_blog

.

On the final soak, we add some salt and vinegar to help with cleansing.

.

DSCF2245_blog

.

Step three

Leave the washed spinach to drain off for a few minutes. This is just half of it – it seems a lot, but the volume reduces drastically when cooked.

DSCF2247_blog

.

Step four

Chop and dice up one large onion, and sauté in olive oil (of course – home produced, so that’s all we use in our kitchen).

DSCF2246_blog

.

Step five

About half way through cooking the onion, we add a good dollop of natural tomato paste. As this is home produced using salt, there is no need to add any salt. We also add our some of our homemade tomato and garlic pasta-type sauce, so you may want to add two or three crushed garlic cloves to the brew instead.

DSCF2248_blog

.

Give it all a good mix as the onion (and garlic) cooks.

.

DSCF2250_blog

.

Step six

Add in the washed and drained spinach, mixing with the onion brew as you go. By the way, you need a pretty large pot for this!

DSCF2251_blog

.

DSCF2252_blog

.

Keep the heat on and stir the whole lot occasionally for about five minutes, until the volume reduces to about half. DO NOT put the lid on during this process, or much of the colour will be lost, and you’ll end up with a less attractive dish.

.

DSCF2254_blog

.

Step seven

Add cold water as shown below (so, not quite covering), put the lid on and bring to the boil. Then stir well, replace the lid, and simmer for a further 30 minutes.

DSCF2255_blog

.

Step eight

This how it should look when done. You can boil off some more of the water if you like, but as that’s where the goodness is we keep the lot 🙂

DSCF2256_blog

.

Step nine

We serve it hot, with plenty of cold fresh yoghurt on top. If you didn’t add garlic to your brew, you can use garlic yoghurt instead – crush two cloves of garlic and mix with fresh yoghurt, or even using garlic powder works ok. Finally, add some flaked red pepper on top to taste.

DSCF2258_blog

.

And this was the dinner table that evening… as well as the spinach, there was a loaf of freshly baked bread, large red peppers shallow fried, more yoghurt (for the peppers are a tad ‘hot’), a fresh salad from the garden, and that’s about it.

.

DSCF2259_blog

.

āfiyet olsun (bon appétit)

.

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “Turkish Style Spinach

  1. Never before heard of yogurt on top of spinach. Thanks for the recipe!

    Like

  2. […] is a bowl of yummy traditionally prepared Turkish spinach. If you want to know more, click here or follow this link (http://wp.me/p3EwFG-3mt) for a step-by-step guide I posted earlier on my blog. […]

    Like

  3. Aparajita says:

    Love your no waste policy. Great to come upon a recipe doing justice to the crunchy stalks and base.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. dayphoto says:

    Well, since I LOVE spinach, and I’m on a mission to learn to cook Turkish this is a perfect recipe for me! Thank you so much!

    Linda ♪♫❤
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com
    https://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com/sherlock-boomer

    Like

...waiting to hear from you...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Page Views

  • 539,987 and counting...

Join 2,857 other followers

Posts by Category

Member of The Internet Defense League

Copyright

© Uncle Spike, Uncle Spike's Adventures, 2013-2017

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author is strictly prohibited.

Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Uncle Spike and Uncle Spike's Adventures with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Reblogs, pingbacks and other such links in order to use Uncle Spike's material are of course welcomed.

%d bloggers like this: