Atatürk’s Mausoleum – Part Two

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Tuesday 18 February, 2014 by Uncle Spike

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An earlier post, entitled Atatürk’s Mausoleum – Part One, was a summary of a recent visit to ‘Anıtkabir’ in Ankara, the capital city of Turkey, and the site of Atatürk’s mausoleum – the founder and first president of the Republic of Turkey.

If you didn’t catch that earlier post, it would make sense to check that out first, so you’ll know what these images are all about.

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The Hall of Honour, where the sarcophagus is held, is pretty impressive. The building itself 57 x 41 metres (188 x 136 ft), with a height of 17 metres (56 ft). This next images show (although not brilliantly I’m afraid), the ornate ceilings of the hall.

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This huge inscription is Atatürk’s last address to the army.
(English version below)

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Below the Ceremonial Plaza and Hall of Honour, is a large museum all about, no surprise, the life and work of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, as the leader of the Turkish War of Independence and the founder and first President of the Republic of Turkey.

Artefacts vary from photographs, Atatürk’s clothing and even the books he wrote, through to a whole host of military equipment and paraphernalia from the period. Then there are huge works of art, the cars he used and even a boat. It’s quite a comprehensive display all told.

The museum is well laid out, with many small rooms and alcoves containing polished glass display cabinets. There are also detailed battle scenes depicting the many struggles, complete with audio and visual effects – pretty good stuff too compared to some museums I’ve seen.

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For me, like Tiananmen Square, the beauty lies in the sheer space of the Ceremonial Plaza. I can spend hours in places like that, just standing or sitting; watching the world and his family wander past. These next few images give you an idea of the scale of the place.

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You walk to/from the mausoleum along what is called the Road of Lions. It is some 260 metres (850 ft) long, with 12 pairs of lions on each side. The five centimetre (2”) gap that separates the paving stones on the Road of Lions is supposed to slow visitors down as a mark of respect on their way to Atatürk’s tomb. Of course, for Cousin Spike Jnr, this just became a rather long game of hopscotch!

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16 thoughts on “Atatürk’s Mausoleum – Part Two

  1. […] is also a second part to this story, entitled Atatürk’s Mausoleum – Part Two (I know, not very original), in which I continue my look at ‘Anıtkabir’ in Ankara, the […]

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  2. Rudy Owens says:

    Wished I had stopped there. He’s everywhere, and there, and there….in Turkey.

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  3. […] Hope you enjoy this entry, but if you want more, here are some other images from this monumental site in Part One and Part Two. […]

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  4. panikikubik says:

    What a coincidence reading this.
    I must tell you something, I don’t tell many people ( because nobody asks and it’s not a topic at the table) .

    My childrens fathers grandpa Arnold – was a close personal friend with Kemal Ataturk, He was invited to Turkey and helped to build railways ( Arnold was an marinofficer and an engineer). Later Arnold also met the russian last tsar Nikolaus the second and got a medal for something.
    (The tsar was shot after the russion revolution).

    I might write a post about my childrens anscestors, they are really brave. No sunlight on me for this – I was once married in to this family. So I’m not a “real” member. But it is my childrens ancestors and I admire my boys father for taking time to collect so much information and interest in his relatives.

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    • Uncle Spike says:

      It would certainly make an interesting post, or two…

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      • panikikubik says:

        Indeed. I still feel it’s most fair to leave those stories left to tell for the boys father. I was “only married into the clan”.
        In due time I can look for my own ancestors – I guess it was a squad of people wearing socks, because it’s hard to find clear footprints after them.

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  5. sueslaght says:

    We did a cycling tour in Turkey two years ago and loved it. One of our best trips!

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  6. How did start to learn Turkish, from your wife’s speech, watching tv, lessons in a book?

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    • Uncle Spike says:

      A mixture. I am not very proficient at all… and we converse in English at home but I can get by with the farming locals and go shopping, hospital visits etc.

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  7. jayantadeepa says:

    Turkey is in our agenda. Hope to put together a budget soon

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