Splittin’ & Moovin’…

30

Tuesday 14 January, 2014 by Uncle Spike

Tiz winter – yay!  Love this time of year, mainly as it’s the only time of the year you’re not dripping with sweat working the farm, or on building or gardening chores.

Currently it’s about 15-19 most days (that’s 59-66 in old money) and bright blue sunny winter skies. We of course get our weekly storm passing through, when we lose power, our storm trenches kick in and we lose a few tree branches. But within 24-36 hours that usually clears and the blue stuff returns to top up my vitamin D.

During summer, which stretches from May to October, the ground tends to resemble my past attempts at baking a flan base; as in it’s rock-hard and impenetrable by anything other than a hefty steel pickaxe.

I shall move on to the farming side of life in a couple of weeks, with jobs such as tree pruning and clipping, organic fertiliser spreading (i.e.goat poo) and all those other glorious jobbies. However right now, the soil is soft but not soggy, so easily diggable, enabling me to get my paws mucky and catch up on some off-season gardening jobs.

This week , as the title suggest, I’m splitting and moving stuff.

I very rarely ever ‘buy’ plants; why bother, they only grow them the same as I can. For example, I ‘found’ two ears (or are they leaves?) of a large cactus lying on the side of the road a couple of years back – I shoved them in the car, planted them and now I keep splitting off chunks and off we go again. We now have some 20 of the beasties…

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And these smaller cacti (dunno any posh Latin names); well these grow like mad here. We had one small indoor plant, and now that has become 70 or so plants in about 5 years – You could split these forever, but then where do you transplant them??

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These little plants are surprisingly resilient in the heat (and we are talking up to 46C (115F) for mid summer. Every night they drop their little blue/purple coloured flowers and new ones appear the next morning; weird. In winter they die right back, so out comes the pick and I dig them up and they split easily into new plants, each with their own roots; and off we go again.

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Back on the cacti front, I bought one medium sized ‘thing’ about 3 years back. It has since grown very well and even spawn a few babies of its own, and so for the second year, I’m transplanting these to another area of the garden 🙂

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Even the Aloevera  (or Hello Vera as I always know it) had babies this year. Finally found a position it is happy in, having been moved about a bit over the past couple of years.

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30 thoughts on “Splittin’ & Moovin’…

  1. irinadim says:

    If I’m not mistaken, that huge thing in the fourth picture has very sharp tips.

    Btw, I nominated your blog in the One Lovely Blog Hop. Have a look.

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  2. ssgt leslie says:

    wow, amazing pictures of the cacti’s, the aloe plant is huge, interesting what will grow in what part of the world. it is interesting.

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    • Uncle Spike says:

      The aloe is in the final image. It once grew to 30cm then died back in a frost (they hate any cold), so these are all maybe just 10-13cm tall.

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      • ssgt leslie says:

        we have them here in fla. yes, cold weather most plant dont like. especially frost. kills the citrus trees here in fla. we need cold weather for about a week to sweeten them while there on the tree, but freezing weather is not good.

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        • Uncle Spike says:

          The citrus trees themselves can handle -5c but any icy rain or -2 temps and the fruit can be damaged overnight (black mildew at the crown where the stem joins the fruit)

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          • ssgt leslie says:

            does not sound to appetizing. fruit trees here in fla take a beating when we have several days of frost. i remember one year, years ago, the fla citrus growers would have to switch over to another fruit if they had another frost.

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  3. OH, how I laughed throughout this. I KNOW what it’s like to keep moving plants. LOL You plant one, it gets too big, has to be moved, another one has babies, that corner gets too crowed and they have to be moved, a tree gets larger and once where there was sun no longer and sun loving plants have to be moved. LMAO!!! I have gardens galore and I am like you. I don’t know the names.

    I used to be nice and organized with little spikes in the ground with tags on them to let me know what in the heck I planted. Along come rain, wind and animals and tag is no longer there, or when I bring them in for the winter, I don’t bring them back out in the spring. And in the interim, I forgot what plant was what. Hehehehehehe

    I’ve gotten to the point I have to make MORE gardens but man, I don’t want to cause it is back breaking work. And besides, I’ve lived more then half my life, so I should have an easier time of things, wouldn’t you say? LOL

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  4. Pat says:

    We spend time in Florida in zone 25. What amazes me is that all I have to do is push something in the ground and it grows. We spend most of our time keeping things under control, whereas in Michigan we have to fight to get desired plants to grow. How different climates are for growing.

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    • Uncle Spike says:

      I know. We even notice the difference from just a couple of miles away. Trying to grow non-native can be infuriating to say the least!

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      • Pat says:

        And I have started some native plants that have become invasive – taking over everything. Good if I have a large area, but otherwise a nuisance.

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        • Uncle Spike says:

          Sounds like us – we planted a couple of small strands of Morning Glory to cover a chainlink fence. It did… but then went on for 30 metres, down a 2 metre wall and into the next farm. Took me 3 sessions of hacking it back and 4 lots of weedkiller to just ‘get control’ 🙂

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  5. fredrieka says:

    I love gardening and splitting and moving. Spring time here my husband says my garden resembles a mine field with all the open holes waiting for the next visitor.

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  6. The Rider says:

    I always love seeing your farm and garden. Your cactus is called “Turksvy” or Turkish Fig in our language, why I wouldn’t know… But we love it’s fruit!

    Like

  7. ballerina95 says:

    And those plants with blue/purple tiny flowers are my favourite. So easy to grow. Somebody told me they’re considered grass?

    Like

  8. ballerina95 says:

    What are cacti good for anyway? Aloe Vera is good for hair growth! I used to rub the sap on my scalp and not to brag or what, I do have thick hair. haha

    Like

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