Pomegranate Time :)

17

Thursday 31 October, 2013 by Uncle Spike

Today was my ‘pommies’ picking day. On the farm I only have just 3 established Pomegranate trees or bushes I guess you should call them, but they were pretty full this year all the same.

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WHEN THEY ARE 'JUST ABOUT TO SPLIT' - THEY ARE RIPE FOR PICKING

WHEN THEY ARE ‘JUST ABOUT TO SPLIT’ – THEY ARE RIPE FOR PICKING

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I think the total yield was around 95 kg (that’s approx. 209 lbs). Quite a few were the size of a small football too, around 50 cm (or 20″) in circumference!

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MANY FRUIT ARE LARGER THAN MY HAND

MANY FRUIT ARE LARGER THAN MY HAND

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The good thing is that they are totally organic too. Pomegranate bushes are not that susceptible to disease, not in this climate, so apart from ants, birds and the damned chooks, not much seems to go wrong with this particular crop. I don’t spray them or use chemical fertilisers at all, just a shovel of goat poo under each bush in February does the trick.

Talking of the chooks, the pesky beggars certainly seem to be partial to a bit of pommie for their supper. At least 8 large fruit had a chook head sized hole underneath, and had been completely hollowed out 🙂

We also have 4 younger bushes which will hopefully start fruiting next season. Three of those are, supposedly, summer Pomegranates, which in theory will give us fresh poms in mid August, rather than late October – perfect for a hot summers day if picked and stored in the fridge.

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THESE BUSHES CAN HOLD ENORMOUS WEIGHTS OF FRUIT

THESE BUSHES CAN HOLD ENORMOUS WEIGHTS OF FRUIT

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A few have started to open up or are starting to soften, so those will be juiced and Pomegranate molasses made from that for our salads. We will scoff a fair amount too over the winter. They are great to eat while sitting in front of the wood burner of a winters evening 🙂 

Hopefully we’ll sell 50 kg or so to friends and work colleagues, but like many locally grown crops, the commercial viability here has largely evaporated as the supermarkets are selling them at less than 1 Turkish Lira a kilo retail (say 20 cents a pound); so you can guess how much the initial farmers would get, perhaps 35-40% of that amount. But I bet it’s not quite the same product, knowing the fertilisers and sprays that will have undoubtedly been used, but for most folk, a low price counts for more than health. I guess that’s understandable in these financial climes.

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EACH CRATE HOLDS AROUND 10kg (or 22 LBS) OF POMS

EACH CRATE HOLDS AROUND 10kg (or 22 LBS) OF POMS

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Anyway, the storeroom shelves are stacked with some huge, yummy pomegranates for winter – job done in my book 🙂 

Still funny to think these monster sized heavy fruit grow on such a small bush; and from such a beautiful and delicate flower…

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KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

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17 thoughts on “Pomegranate Time :)

  1. Living Love says:

    What an incredible insight!!! Love it. And yum!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. lilianausvat says:

    Public gardens with pomegranate witl live music shows and musical fountains woul bena neat touristic destination

    Like

  3. so nice and fresh.. I absolutely love pomegranates…thanks for sharing uncle spike..

    Like

  4. timecollage says:

    I guess the difference between organic grown and conventional is ultimately the human touch or its lack thereof, with the “added value” of pesticides and other -cides ending substances in the case of conventional produce. And that’s what we are paying for, mass-produced foods. I have always thought that governments should make it easier for farmers than for the big companies to get subsidies and to sell their products, but then the big companies … have it their way.

    Sorry for the negative note here. Please don’t let my husband find out that you have your own pomegranate trees, or he’ll take a plane and come straight to you 😀

    Also, I think it’s very interesting that the pomegranates are not susceptible to disease. Great information. Harvesting can be so fun!

    Like

    • Uncle Spike says:

      What a great ‘reply’ – thanks 🙂

      People have limited money and so they choose on price, not quality or ethics – we all do it with clothing for example. That’s just the way of the world, hey ho.

      We’ll keep an eye out for your husband.

      Glad you liked the post anyway 😀

      Happy Friday and all that jazz…
      UNCLE SPIKE

      Like

  5. Heike says:

    Frenchie will be jealous when he sees these photos 🙂

    Like

  6. Peter S says:

    Wow, that must be so exciting to have your own fruit trees. Here we have apple orchards nearby, but nothing more exotic than that, but I suppose pomegranates would be much more common there than here of course.

    Like

    • Uncle Spike says:

      We have a mix of fruit, mainly clementine, summer/winter oranges, blood oranges, seville oranges, summer/winter lemons, tangerines, apricot, pomela, jujubee, green fig, black fig, red apple, green apple, plum, bergamot, pomegranate, white/red grape, blackberry, strawberry, nectarine, peach, sour cherry, cherry, pear and kiwi

      Like

  7. ballerina95 says:

    the bottom photo is the pomegranates as they are growing? And what are chooks? 🙂

    Like

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